Two Days Tour

BIRDSVILLE
  • Cameron Corner
  • Strzelecki Desert
  • Burke and Wills “Dig Tree”
  • Cooper Creek.
  • Birdsville Hotel
  • Simpson Desert
  • Broken Hill RFDS Museum

Day 1:

Depart Mildura & track North West for our first landing at Broken Hill.

Broken Hill is the only RFDS base in Australia where visitors can see a working RFDS Base in action. Visit the Museum & take a guided tour of the operations, including the communications room & hangar.

We then head north for Cameron Corner, where the States of Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia meet. Have some refreshments and walk in three States. Once airborne again we head out over the Strzelecki Dessert for Birdsville. Formerly known as Diamantina Crossing; Birdsville is on the edge of the Simpson Desert at the end of the Birdsville track. Once a place through which cattle drovers moved their stock, Birdsville was a Customs collection point. In the days before Federation in 1901, a toll was payable on all stock entering South Australia from Queensland.

Under the desert is the Great Artesian Basin, one of the largest inland drainage areas in the world. Water from the basin rises to the surface at numerous natural springs, including Dalhousie Springs.

We stay the night in the famous Birdsville Hotel, here you can explore the town and visit the Museum.

Day 2:

Our first stop is at the “Dig Tree” Burke and Wills Camp 65 located on the banks of the Cooper Creek. The Burke & Wills Expedition is a fascinating part of Australian history, a tale of great courage, endurance and tragedy. The Dig Tree marks the stockade Depot Camp 65. The tree was carved with “B LXV” on the creek side, this carving is still partially visible today over one hundred and fifty years later. Burke, Wills, Gray and King set off for the Gulf of Carpentaria asking the other men to wait for 3 months for their return. After 18 weeks at Camp 65 they had come to believe that Burke would never return. Before leaving they buried some provisions in case Burke did return, and carved a message on a tree to mark the spot. “Dig 3FT NW” They left Cooper Creek on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1861. Burke, Wills and King returned to camp that same evening!

We land only a few hundred metres from the Dig Tree, take time to enjoy the serenity of this beautiful spot, learn more about the expedition and take some photos that you will treasure forever.

From the Dig Tree we head South over the Barrier Ranges for Mildura.

$2095 per person including accommodation (min2)

COOBER PEDY
  • Broken Hill RFDS Museum
  • Marree “Ghan Town”
  • Coober Pedy
  • Painted Hills
  • Leigh Creek
  • Flinders Rangers
  • Wilpena Pound

Day 1:

Depart Mildura & track North West for our first landing at Broken Hill.

Broken Hill is the only RFDS base in Australia where visitors can see a working RFDS Base in action. Visit the Museum & take a guided tour of the operations, including the communications room & hangar.

We then head off over Lake Frome and the Flinders Ranges to Marree, Located at the junction of the Birdsville & Oodnadatta tracks. The name Marree comes from the Aboriginal word Mari meaning place of many possums; it was originally known as Hergott Springs but changed after the First World War.

The Museum Park opposite the hotel has a collection of memorabilia right in the town centre, including the old mail truck in which Tom Kruse used for many years to take the mail from Marree to Birdsville. Check out the time on the Camel Sundial made from old railway sleepers!

Marree is home to Australia’s first mosque, which was made of mud brick and built by the Afghan cameleers, employed building the Ghan Railway. Descendants of those Afghan cameleers, who helped to build the Overland Telegraph and the Ghan railway line, still live in town.

Leaving Marree we initially follow the Oodnadatta track past Lake Eyre South, as the track turns north for Oodnadatta, we continue west for Coober Pedy.

Coober Pedy is known as the Opal Capital of the world, the town is surrounded by a moon like landscape dotted with shafts and mullock heaps.

The name Coober Pedy comes from the Aboriginal term kupa-piti; which means “white man’s hole”. Most of the population here live underground to escape the extreme daytime heat.

The opal shops in Coober Pedy have more opal on display than anywhere else in the world.

You can also take a guided tour of the opal Mines.

Day 2:

The first highlight of the return journey is the “Painted Hills” this spectacular sight is only accessible by air. The Painted Hills are a rocky outcrop of large and small hills, which emerge suddenly out of a flat desert landscape, formed when the area was an ancient river floodplain. Our track then takes us over Lake Torrens for the Flinders Ranges and Wilpena Pound. This extraordinary landscape is 800 million years old; it’s natural amphitheatre is the centre piece to the Flinders Ranges National Park.

$2095 per person (min 2)